Researchers found numerous ring-like structures inside France's Bruniquel Cave. They believe they were built by Neanderthals some 176,000 years ago. Etienne FABRE - SSAC hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Mysterious Cave Rings Show Neanderthals Liked To Build

Deep in a French cave, researchers have found numerous ovals of broken stalagmites. They believe the rings were arranged by ancient Neanderthals.

Mysterious Cave Rings Show Neanderthals Liked To Build
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People demonstrate in Le Havre, in northwestern France, on Thursday. A series of protests and strikes have been held over the past few months, to oppose a government plan to change France's labor law. Charly Triballeau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Protests Escalate In France As Labor Groups Face Off With Government

French President Francois Hollande wants to loosen the nation's strict labor code. The country's largest union is fiercely opposed.

Pharmacists in California will have to give women a short health consultation before providing contraceptives without a prescription. Media for Medical/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Shots - Health News

It's Still Hard To Get Birth Control Pills In California Without A Prescription

KQED Public Media

State law now permits pharmacists to sell many types of hormonal birth control methods without a doctor's OK. But good luck finding a drugstore that will dispense the contraceptives that way.

Andrew Heineman's twin brother, Marcus, pulls a cultivator across a different field where they will plant seed corn this year, another alternative they selected when the price of corn started to fall and a new seed corn plant opened up nearby. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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The Salt

To Survive The Bust Cycle, Farmers Go Back To Business-School Basics

Iowa Public Radio

Farming is entering its third year on the bust side of the cycle. Major crop prices are low while expenses like seed, fertilizer and land remain high. That means getting creative to succeed.

To Survive The Bust Cycle, Farmers Go Back To Business-School Basics
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Jake Ralston with his father Jon Ralston. This week, Jake successfully petitioned to change the name and gender on his birth certificate to reflect that he is male. Courtesy of Jon Ralston hide caption

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U.S.

When Maddy Became Jake: A Father And Son's Enduring Love

Jake, born female, was 5 when he says he first told his dad he was a boy. Jon thought it was a phase, but came to accept it, and 15 years later Jake made his new name and gender official.

When Maddy Became Jake: A Father And Son's Enduring Love
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Moby's new memoir, Porcelain, is a tale of dance clubs, DJs, and New York City in the 1990s. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Author Interviews

In 'Porcelain,' Moby Searches For Validation And Finds Unlikely Success

The electronic musician's new memoir traces his journey from Connecticut suburbs to New York City raves. It's a tale of dance clubs, DJs and Manhattan in the 1990s full of self-deprecating humor.

In 'Porcelain,' Moby Searches For Validation And Finds Unlikely Success
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Georgia O'Keeffe's 1926 painting The Barns, Lake George, which has been privately owned and rarely displayed, but now joins the collection of the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe. © Christie's Images Limited hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

O'Keeffe Museum Acquires Rarely Seen Work By The Famed Artist

An atmospheric image of barns in Lake George, N.Y., is joining the collection at the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, N.M. The painting reveals a lesser-known genre of the artist's work.

Paul Simon's latest album, Stranger To Stranger, is due out June 3. Myrna Suarez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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First Listen

Preview The New Album From Paul Simon, 'Stranger To Stranger'

After 13 solo albums, Simon still views pop as a language of exuberant dances and polyrhythmic upheavals. Even now, his music pulses with the feeling of invention.

Stranger to Stranger
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    Stranger to Stranger
    Album
    Stranger to Stranger
    Artist
    Paul Simon
    Label
    Concord/Universal
    Released
    2016

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U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (right), along with British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (left), speak to reporters in London on May 12. They tried to assure European banks they won't be penalized for conducting legitimate business with Iran. Critics say it should not be up to the U.S. to encourage investment in Iran. Josh Lederman/AP hide caption

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Parallels - World News

John Kerry's Awkward Push For Investment In Iran

The secretary of state negotiated the nuclear deal and wants it to work. He recently went to Europe to encourage banks there to invest in Iran.

John Kerry's Awkward Push For Investment In Iran
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Nick and Diane Camerada stand inside their home on Staten Island, N.Y. During Superstorm Sandy, the Cameradas had water up to the second floor of their home. More than three years later, they are still living in a home that is only partially renovated while continuing to deal with bureaucratic nightmares. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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NPR News Investigations

Business Of Disaster: Local Recovery Programs Struggle To Help Homeowners

State and local disaster relief programs are leaving communities impacted by Superstorm Sandy confused by the dizzying array of directives on how to rebuild.

Business Of Disaster: Local Recovery Programs Struggle To Help Homeowners
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Thirteen-year-old Alex Iyer (left) gives 6-year-old Akash Vukoti a high-five as Akash leaves the stage after misspelling a word in Round 3 of the 2016 Scripps National Spelling Bee on Wednesday in National Harbor, Md. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

6-Year-Old May Be Out Of Spelling Bee, But This Kid Is A Winner

Akash Vukoti was the youngest contestant in this year's Scripps National Spelling Bee. He didn't go all the way this time, but we've got our eye on him.